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Recent Events & Courses

PAST EVENTS AND COURSES

ONLINE COURSE OFFERING Summer 2013
The Planets -- Astronomy & Earth And Planetary Science
W12
, summer session C, June 124- August 16, 2013, CCN 30905 or 16335

Earn UC credit while you are away. Satisfies the physical science requirement. All you need is a fast internet connection. Instruction is exclusively online:

  • Follow videorecorded lectures
  • Online homework
  • Online discussions
  • One online midterm exam

  • There is an in-class final exam to be taken on campus or with a proctoring service available nationwide.

This class provides a tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? This course is light on math but will introduce basic physics & chemistry to understand moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans.

Instructor: B. Militzer
Click here for course website.

PLANET AND STAR FORMATION (PSF) GROUP MEETING SPRING 2013
Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Location HFA B1

Organizers: Eugene Chiang

The Planet and Star Formation (PSF) group meeting is intended to foster local collaboration between Berkeley researchers working in related fields. Our goals are to keep abreast of PSF-related research developments at Berkeley and, more broadly, to educate ourselves about new research and topics of interest in the field.

Click here for the seminar website.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
January 31, 2013
Bruce Buffett, UC Berkeley Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science
"Geomagnetic Reversals: A Quantitative Model Built on Clay"

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
April 4, 2013
Mike Brown, Caltech
"Tales from the Outer Solar System"

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


PLANET AND STAR FORMATION (PSF) GROUP MEETING FALL 2012
Wednesdays, 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Location HFA B1

Organizers: Eugene Chiang

The Planet and Star Formation (PSF) group meeting is intended to foster local collaboration between Berkeley researchers working in related fields. Our goals are to keep abreast of PSF-related research developments at Berkeley and, more broadly, to educate ourselves about new research and topics of interest in the field.

Click here for the seminar website.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
Date November 29, 2012
Speaker: Sarah Stewart, Harvard University
"Origin of Earth and Moon "

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
Date September 20, 2012
Speaker: James Lloyd, Cornell
"Retired Planet Hosts: Not so Massive, Maybe Just Portly After Lunch "

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER DISTINGUISHED LECTURE IN ASTRONOMY
Supernovae Reveal an Accelerating Universe
Adam Riess , StSCi / Johns Hopkins University

October 3 , 2012, Wednesday, 5:00pm
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center, UC Berkeley

In 1929 Edwin Hubble discovered that our Universe is expanding. Eighty years later, the Space Telescope that bears his name is being used to study an even more surprising phenomenon: that the expansion is speeding up. The origin of this effect is not known, but is broadly attributed to a type of “dark energy” first posited to exist by Albert Einstein and now dominating the mass-energy budget of the Universe. Professor Riess will describe how his team shared in the discovery of the acceleration of the Universe and why understanding the nature of dark energy presents one of the greatest remaining challenges in astrophysics and cosmology.

This is a free public lecture.


EDGE MEETING
22 February 2012
8:50am- 5:00pm
Space Sciences Lab, Room #105

This is a workshop on a potential discovery meeting to Europa, the Europa Deep Geophysical Explorer (EDGE) Mission. This meeting is by invitation only. If you would like to attend, contact Imke de Pater.

For the meeting agenda, click here.


PLANET AND STAR FORMATION (PSF) GROUP MEETING
Wednesdays, 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Location HFA B

The Planet and Star Formation (PSF) group meeting is intended to foster local collaboration between Berkeley researchers working in related fields. Our goals are to keep abreast of PSF-related research developments at Berkeley and, more broadly, to educate ourselves about new research and topics of interest in the field.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
9 February 2012
Margaret Pan
"Adventures in Debris Disk Physics "
abstracts/pan_abstract.pdf
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


ONLINE COURSE OFFERING Summer 2012
The Planets -- Astronomy & Earth And Planetary Science
W12
, summer session C, June 18 - August 10, 2012, CCN 30905 or 16340

Earn UC credit while you are away. Satisfies the physical science requirement. All you need is a fast internet connection. Instruction is exclusively online:

  • Follow videorecorded lectures
  • Online homework
  • Online discussions
  • Two online midterm exams

  • There is an in-class final exam to be taken on campus or with a proctoring service available nationwide.

This class provides a tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course is light on math but will introduce basic physics & chemistry to understand moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans.

Instructor: B. Militzer
Click here for course website.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
9 February 2012
Margaret Pan
"Adventures in Debris Disk Physics "
abstracts/pan_abstract.pdf
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
26 January 2012
Tristan Guillot, Observatoire de la Cote dAzure
"Inferring the Compositions of Giant Planets: From Jupiter to Exoplanets"

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2011
Astro C250
Planetary Dynamics
Organizers: Eugene Chiang, Margaret Pan
Time & Location: Fridays, 1:00pm - 4pm, 401 McCone Hall

Course Description:
Topics covered in this class: gravitational dynamics and formation of planetary bodies; orbital motions of planets, satellites, and minor bodies, in extrasolar systems and in the solar system; analytic and numerical techniques; and secular theory, mean-motion resonances, chaos, disk-planet interactions including planetary coagulation and orbital migration, tides, and spin-orbit coupling.

The goal of this class is to understand and critique the current deluge of literature on the dynamics of extrasolar planets.

Click here for the class website.


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2011
Astro C292-008
Planet and Star Formation Seminar
Organizers: Eugene Chiang, Meredith Hughes, Mate Adamkovics, Al Glassgold
Time & Location: Tuesdays, 3:00pm - 4pm, Hearst Field Annex (HFA), Room B5

Course Description:
The Planet and Star Formation (PSF) seminar is intended to foster local collaboration between Berkeley researchers working in related fields. Our goals are to keep abreast of PSF-related research developments at Berkeley and, more broadly, to educate ourselves about new research and topics of interest in the field.

Click here for the seminar website.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
22 September 2011
Sean Solomon , Cargegie Institution of Washington, Dept of Terrestrial Magnetism
"Exploring the Planet Mercury with the MESSENGER Spacecraft "
abstracts/solomon_abstract.pdf
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 141 McCone


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
1 September 2011
Alex Hayes , UC Berkeley
"A Guide to Lakefront Vacationing on Titan: Hydrocarbon Lakes and their Role in the Methane Cycle"

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 141 McCone
PUBLIC LECTURE
The Discovery of the First Earth-Size Planets and the Prospects for Life in the Universe
Geoff Marcy, UC Berkeley

May 17, 2011, Tuesday, 5:00pm
Tilden Room, MLK Student Union, UC Berkeley

Science fiction taught us that our Milky Way Galaxy abounds with habitable planets populated by advanced civilizations engaged in interstellar commerce and conflict.  Back in our real universe, Earth-like planets and alien life have proved elusive.  Has science fiction led us astray?   NASA recently launched a new space-borne telescope, Kepler, dedicated to discovering the first Earth-like worlds around other stars.  We announced a truly rocky planet and the discovery of over 1200 planets having sizes less than twice that of Earth. These discoveries offer clues about the prevalence of worlds suitable for life.   But what properties make a planet livable? How common is life in the universe, especially intelligent life?   New telescopic and biological observations are providing the first answers to these questions

This is a free public lecture.


WORKSHOP & FOCUS GROUP
MAY 23 & 24, 2011
ENCFG MEETING at SETI, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA

The next meeting of the Enceladus Focus Group will be held at SETI in Mountain View, California on May 23/24, 2011. The meeting's focus is, of course, on the current activity discovered at the south pole of Enceladus, and on the significance and implications of this discovery for the presence of liquid water and a habitable zone beneath the south polar terrain and for astrobiology.

We are calling for presentations falling within four broad areas:

1. Energy/Mechanisms: The jetting activity at Enceladus' south pole, and related geological and geophysical investigations; the moon's energy budget and thermal/geological history.

2. Habitability: Is there a liquid water reservoir beneath the surface of Enceladus?

3. Biomarkers/Astrobiology: Biomarkers in the plume: What has been, or can be, observed from Cassini; What should be sought in the future; Relevant astrobiological considerations.

4. Future Missions: Mission requirements and concepts for future exploration of Enceladus

This meeting will be sponsored by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado, by SETI in Mountain View, California, and by the Center for Integrative Planetary Science (CIPS) at UC Berkeley. The organizers are Carolyn Porco and Chris McKay. The local organization contact is Franck Marchis (fmarchis@berkeley.edu).

Please register here for the May 23/24, 2011 meeting.
http://encfg.ciclops.org/meeting_registration.php


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
14 April 2011
Jonathan Mitchell , UCLA

"The tropical nature of Titan's climate and storms " Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 141 McCone

COURSE OFFERING Spring 2011
AY 292, Section 6, CCN 06115
Planetary Science Seminar
A Reading and Discussion Seminar at the graduate student level
Faculty Instructor: Geoff Marcy
Postdoc instructors: Margaret Pan, Andrew Howard, Edwin Kite, Lucianne Walkowicz, Heather Knutson
Time & Location: Fri 10:30am - noon, 544 Campbell Hall

Weekly readings and discussion of current research in planetary science with an emphasis on exoplanets and the Kepler mission, including observations, theories, and prospective future research.

Course syllabus/ Reading assignments


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2011
Astro / EPS C12/ L&S C70T
The Planets
Faculty Instructors: Geoff Marcy & Burkhard Militzer
Time & Location: T-Th 12:30-2pm + section requirements, 4 Le Conte

Course Description:
A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Intended for non science majors.


RAYMOND & BEVERLY SACKLER DISTINGUISHED LECTURE IN ASTRONOMY
The Galactic Center: Uncovering the Pulse of our Galaxy
Andrea Ghez, UCLA

March 30, 2011, Wednesday, 5:00pm
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center, UC Berkeley

More than a quarter century ago, it was suggested that galaxies such as our own Milky Way may harbor massive, though possibly dormant, central black holes. Definitive proof, for or against, the existence of a massive central black hole lies in the assessment of the distribution of matter in the center of the Galaxy.  The motion of the stars in the vicinity of a black hole offers a way to determine this distribution.  Based on 15 years of high resolution imaging, the case for a supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center has moved from being a possibility to a certainty. Additionally, spectroscopy has revealed that the stars orbiting in such close proximity are apparently massive and young; the origin of these stars is difficult to explain, given the strong tidal forces, and may provide key insight into the growth of the central black hole.

This is a free public lecture.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
3 February 2011
Oded Aharonson , Caltech

"Unveiling Titan: A World Strange yet Familiar" Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 141 McCone

JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
9 December 2010
Jean-Luc Margot, UCLA

"
Solar System Binaries and Triples: Properties, Origin, and Evolution " Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


ASTRO 2010 TOWN HALL MEETING
Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey
29 November 2010

Go to the townhall meeting website, below, to see slides from many of the talks.

  • 1:00pm- Imke de Pater, UC Berkeley: Welcome
  • 1:10pm- Roger Blandford, Stanford University: General Review
  • 1:50pm- Claire Max, UCSC: Overview of the report of the Panel on Optical and Infrared Astronomy from the Ground
  • 2:05- Mike Bolte, UCSC: TMT
  • 2:20pm- Tony Tyson, UC Davis: LSST
  • 2:35pm- Saul Perlmutter, LBNL: WFIRST
  • 2:50pm- Geoff Bower, UC Berkeley: Radio Landscape (includes FASR, ATA, SKA, CCAT)
  • 3:10pm- Stuart Bale, UC Berkeley, SSL: ATST
  • 3:30pm- Josh Bloom, UC Berkeley: SASIR
  • 3:45pm- David Schlegel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: BIG BOSS
  • 4:00pm- General Discussion

To register and for more information : townhall/index.html


SPECIAL SEMINAR
Bryce Croll, University of Toronto
12 November 2010
11:00 am, 544 Campbell Hall


"Characterizing the Thermal Emission of Hot Jupiters and the Spectral Features of Super-Earths in the Near-Infrared" Abstract

BLITZED 65
29 - 30 October 2010

Clark Kerr Campus, UC Berkeley

This is a symposium marking the occation of Leo Blitz's 65th birthday and celebrating his scientific legacy. Talks will be presented by Leo's colleagues, as well as by former students and postdocs. The presentation topics will cover the full range of Leo's work and include molecular clouds, star formation, Milky Way structure, and the properties of the ISM in external galaxies.

To register and for more information : http://sites.google.com/site/blitzed65/


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
21 October 2010
Nick Schneider, University of Colorado

"
Plumes on Enceladus: The Ocean Debate " Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


KECK SCIENCE & STRATEGIC PLANNING MEETING

October 15, Friday, Keck Science Meeting
October 16, Saturday, Keck Strategic Planning
Bancroft Hotel, 2680 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA 94708

Organizing committee: Geoff Marcy (UC Berkeley)

The University of California, Berkeley welcomes the annual meeting of the Keck Observatory user community this year. The meeting will include two full days of both oral and poster presentations from the scientific partners of the Keck Observatory including UC, Caltech, UH, NASA, TSIP, Yale, Swinburne, and WMKO. Participants of the meeting will share recent and exciting scientific results based on observations conducted with the Keck I and Keck II telescopes on Mauna Kea. The meeting will also provide a venue to informally discuss the current state of the Keck Observatory and its future. This will include planning for new initiatives and considering next generation instrumentation. The meeting will take place over two full days. The first day will consist of short talks and posters. Talks will be selected from the proposed titles/abstracts submitted by September 1, 2010. Anyone may present a poster, but must provide notification ahead of time to ensure that room is available. The second day will be Keck Strategic Planning.

For more information about this upcoming meeting, click here.


ONLINE COURSE OFFERING Summer 2010
The Planets -- Earth And Planetary Science
(EPS) N12
/ (Astro) N12

Earn UC credit while you are away. All you need is a fast internet connection. Instruction is exclusively online:

  • Follow videorecorded lectures
  • Online homework
  • Online discussions
  • Two online midterm exams

  • Note however, there is an in-class final exam to be taken on campus or with a proctoring service available nationwide.
This class provides a tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course is light on math but will introduce basic physics & chemistry to understand moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe.

Instructors: G. Marcy & B. Militzer
Course Format: Six hours of web-based lecture for eight weeks. Class meets Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 1:00pm to 3:30pm.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for N12 after taking C12 or Astronomy C12.
Course Control Numbers:16340 and 31005,
Units/Credit:3
Satisfies the physical science requirement
Enrollment deadline is June 14, 2010
Session Dates: 06/21-08/13/10
Summer Fees: UC Undergraduate $876.00, UC Graduate $1,230.00, Visiting $960.00

Registration is open now. The deadline to add/enroll in courses is two weeks after the start of instruction. For more info about canceling, refunds for summer, please go to: http://summer.berkeley.edu/registration/schedule

Click here for course website.


HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS (HEDP) WORKSHOP
From Planets to Stars:
Creating and Controlling Matter at High Energy Density - Solids at 100-fold Compression to Nuclear Fusion

12-13 May 2010
Room 105, Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), 7 Gauss Way, UC Berkeley (see "Getting to the HEDP Workshop at SSL" for maps)

Organizing committee: Raymond Jeanloz, Geoff Marcy, Roger Falcone (UC Berkeley), and Gilbert Collins (LLNL)

AGENDA

A major new suite of experimental capabilities is becoming available for characterizing matter at unprecedented conditions, from the pressures and temperatures of supergiant planets to the ignition of thermonuclear fusion. Notably, the National Ignition Facility (https://lasers.llnl.gov/) is now operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and there is widespread interest in making this facility available to the scientific community at large.

For the first time, the atomic scale of pressure (Hartree Energy/Bohr Volume = 294 million atmospheres) will be exceeded in controlled laboratory experiments, reproducing conditions deep inside planets, brown dwarfs and even stars. Processes from planetary impacts to stellar explosions can be investigated, as can relativistic plasmas.

A significant motivation for this work is to characterize the onset of thermonuclear fusion, and to control matter at the extreme conditions involved. The research involves physical and mathematical sciences as well as engineering, and impacts energy, non-proliferation and global security as well as fundamental science.

This small workshop is being organized to inform the UC Berkeley research community about recent scientific breakthroughs in high energy density research and fusion science, and to identify how Berkeley could best take advantage of the new opportunities available in these fields.

If you would like to attend, email Barbara Hoversten at bhovers@astro.berkeley.edu.
Space is limited.


FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
The Great Debate: Are we Alone?
Dan Werthimer (SETI Program Director) & Geoff Marcy (Professor, UC Berkeley) debate the existence of Technological Civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy

April 30, 2010, Friday, 7:30pm
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center, UC Berkeley

Science Fiction portrays our Milky Way Galaxy as teeming with advanced civilizations engaged in interstellar communication, commerce, and occasionally star wars.  If so, great Galactic societies anticipate offering membership to Earth.  Back in our real universe, extraterrestrial life has proved elusive.  None has been found.   The arguments for and against technological life in the Galaxy have sharpened in recent years.   Evidence abounds on Earth of the hardiness of life even in extremely harsh environments.   Other evidence suggests the Earth may be a rare type of planet, unusually benign for life as we know it.    Evidence on both sides is mounting.  Which one is right?   There can be only one answer:  Either the Milky Way is teeming with technological life or it isn't.  Renowned SETI scientist Dan Werthimer will debate planet-hunter and skeptic, Geoff Marcy.

Can't come? The 'Great Debate' will be streamed live at:
http://www.ustream.tv/channel/are-we-alone-the-great-debate


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2010
Astro 250
Planets and Life
A Reading and Discussion Seminar at the graduate student level
For graduate students, postdocs and faculty

Faculty Instructor: Imke de Pater
Postdoc instructors: Heather Knutson and others
Time & Location: Wed 1:00pm - 3:00pm, 544 Campbell Hall

“Planets and Life”, or astrobiology, refers to the study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth, on other planets, or in its broadest sense throughout the cosmos:  What is life, how did it form, and where is it?  It is an integrative, multidisciplinary field that includes areas of astronomy, biology, (bio)chemistry, geology, and physics.

Weekly readings will be assigned from a variety of sources, with the ultimate goal to learn more about the intriguing field of astrobiology. A list of (preliminary) resources from which readings will be assigned is given below.

Click here for Course syllabus/ Reading assignments


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2010
Astro / EPS C12/ L&S C70T
The Planets
Faculty Instructors: G. Marcy & B. Militzer
Time & Location: T Th 11:00am - 12:30pm, 100 GPB

Course Description:
This class will provide a tour of the planets and moons of the solar system, and an introduction to their internal structures, atmospheres, and surface features. Processes that form planets and act continually to change them (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, giant impacts) are discussed, as are comets, asteroids, rings, and life. Information gained from recent spacecraft missions is highlighted. Intended for non science majors.


SEMINAR
5 March 2010
Kunio Sayanagi
Caltech (Planetary Science Division)
"
Zonal Jet Formation in 3D stratified Turbulence with Applications to Jupiter " Abstract

10:30 - 11:30am , 1165 Etchevery Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
18 March 2010
James Farquhar

"
TBA" Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2010
Astro 250
Planets and Life
A Reading and Discussion Seminar at the graduate student level
For graduate students, postdocs and faculty

Faculty Instructor: Imke de Pater
Postdoc instructors: Heather Knutson and others
Time & Location: Wed 1:00pm - 3:00pm, 544 Campbell Hall

“Planets and Life”, or astrobiology, refers to the study of the origin and evolution of life on Earth, on other planets, or in its broadest sense throughout the cosmos:  What is life, how did it form, and where is it?  It is an integrative, multidisciplinary field that includes areas of astronomy, biology, (bio)chemistry, geology, and physics.

Weekly readings will be assigned from a variety of sources, with the ultimate goal to learn more about the intriguing field of astrobiology. A list of (preliminary) resources from which readings will be assigned is given below.

Click here for Course syllabus/ Reading assignments


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2010
Astro / EPS C12/ L&S C70T
The Planets
Faculty Instructors: G. Marcy & B. Militzer
Time & Location: T Th 11:00am - 12:30pm, 100 GPB

Course Description:
This class will provide a tour of the planets and moons of the solar system, and an introduction to their internal structures, atmospheres, and surface features. Processes that form planets and act continually to change them (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, giant impacts) are discussed, as are comets, asteroids, rings, and life. Information gained from recent spacecraft missions is highlighted. Intended for non science majors.


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
11 February 2010
Jay Melosh

"
Results from NASA’s Deep Impact Mission to Comet Tempel 1 " AbstractTea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


21 January 2010
Doug Lin

"
Origin of Super Earths" Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
19 November 2009
Norman Sleep

"
The interaction of photosynthesis with the crust and mantle and the effect of the moon-forming impact on the current Earth" Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2009
Graduate Seminar: Astro 250
Rocky and Icy Planets
Faculty Instructors: G. Marcy, M. Manga, E. Chiang
Postdoc instructors: Heather Knutson, Margaret Pan, Andrew Howard, & Lucianne Walkowicz
Time & Location: Mondays 12:00pm - 2:00pm, 265 McCone Hall

Course Description:
This graduate seminar will focus on rocky exoplanets. The course will involve reading key articles on the formation, dynamical evolution, interior physics, exterior properties, and observational techniques toward understanding rocky and icy planets in general. Students will lead the discussions, with participation by everyone assembled.

CLASS SYLLABUS


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2009
Astro C162/ EPS C162
Planetary Astrophysics
Instructor: I. de Pater
T Th 2:30pm - 5:00pm
544 Campbell Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
24 September 2009
David Jewitt, UCLA

"Primordial Ice Reservoirs of the Solar System " Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
5 March 2009
Russ Howard

"The SECCHI Experiment on the STEREO Mission" Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
19 February 2009
Peter Smith

"Phoenix in Wonderland " Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2009
C12 or L&S C70T
The Planets
Instructors: G. Marcy & B. Militzer
Time & Location: T Th 11am - 12:30pm, 4 Le Conte


Io Workshop
December 11 & 12, 2008
1:00pm - 5:30pm Thursday, 9:30am - 5:30pm Friday, Lunch included.
Organizer: Franck Marchis
Space Sciences Lab #105,
For workshop poster with speakers and talks, click here.
For workshop website with travel details and schedule, click here.
RSVP REQUIRED: fmarchis@berkeley.edu
SEMINAR SERIES Fall 2008
Astro 250/ EPS 290 Graduate Seminar, open to everyone.
Meteorites and the Solar System
Instructors: Imke de Pater / Anna Butterworth
Wednesdays 11-1pm
365 McCone Hall

October 22: Andrew Westphal, Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley
"Stardust: first samples from a known comet and first solid samples of the local ISM"

October 29: Vera Fernandes, BGC
"Moon/ Earth System: lunar meteorites and Apollo samples reveal the formation and history of the Moon" [abstract]

November 5: Amy Gaffney (LLNL)
"Martian meteorites as records of planetary differentiation, volcanism and water on Mars"

November 13- 4pm, 2 Le Conte: Kevin McKeegan, UCLA
" The oxygen isotopic composition of captured solar wind: first results from the Genesis mission" [abstract]

November 19: Special Guest, open to everyone:
Larry Nittler, Carnegie Institution of Washington
"Supernova Dust in the Solar System" [abstract]
NOTE ROOM CHANGE FOR THIS LECTURE: 105 North Gate

11am - 12 noon

Course Syllabus

Course format: Two hours per week including up to 1 hour lecture plus 1 hour discussion and/or hands-on interaction with meteorites.
Description: This multidisciplinary course discusses what we have learned about the Solar System from laboratory studies of meteorites and how these studies are complimentary to observations of asteroids, planets and other solar systems. After a short introduction about the different meteorite types, and their chemical, mineralogical and isotopic composition, we will discuss their links to asteroids, comets, Mars and the Moon. In the second part we will discuss how meteorite studies have constrained the age of the Solar system, the formation history of asteroids, and the delivery of meteorites from the asteroid belt to Earth. This part will also include lunar and martian chronology and the role of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system. Finally, we will discuss preliminary results from the two recent sample return missions from the Solar Wind (Genesis) and comet Wild 2 (Stardust), and review what questions remain to be answered. In the last week, we’ll tour some of the labs (ALS, SSL), where these studies are performed.


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2008
Astro 162 / EPS 162:
Solar System Astrophysics
Instructor: Imke de Pater

JOINT PHYSICS/ ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
24 November 2008
G.W. Collins

"Recreating Core States of Giant Planets in the Laboratory: A new Generation of Condensed Matter Science" Abstract

Tea: 4:00pm, 3rd floor Breezeway between Birge and LeConte
Colloquium: 4:30 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
23 October 2008
Sushil Atreya,
University of Michigan
Titan's methaneAbstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
13 November 2008
Kevin McKeegan,
UCLA
Title: TBA Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
4 September 2008
Bill Hubbard,
University of Arizona
Gravity Waves in Pluto's Sub-microbar AtmosphereAbstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


SPRING 2008 CIPS SEMINAR SERIES
Organizer:
Mate Adamkovics

  • January 23 : Alyssa Sarid, UC Berkeley, EPS
    "The Dynamics of Europa as Inferred From Tidally-Driven Fractures"Abstract
  • February 6 : Paul Kalas , UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "A renaissance in imaging circumstellar debris disks with HST" Abstract
  • February 13- Joint with Theory Lunch: Burkhard Militzer, UC Berkeley, EPS
    "Planetary Science with a Handful of Atoms"Abstract
  • February 27 : Elena Adams, University of Michigan
    "How Titan got his cloak: Saturn's moon and the origin of its nitrogen atmosphere" Abstract
  • March 5 : John T. Clarke, Boston University
    "Topics of interest to people who study giant planets at large distances"
  • March 12- Joint with Theory Lunch : Rory Barnes, University of Arizona
  • March 19 : Geoff Marcy
    "Other Earths: Formation, Structure, and Detection"
  • April 2-Joint with Theory Lunch : Ruth Murray-Clay, UC Berkeley
    "Two Problems in Planet Formation: the Kuiper Belt and Hot Jupiters " Abstract
  • April 16: Maegan Spencer, Stanford University
    "Detecting extraterrestrial organic compounds in aerogel-capture hypervelocity particles" Abstract
  • April 23: Justin Simon, Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science, UC Berkeley
    "Al/Mg Isotope Evidence for the Formation of Refractory Inclusions in the Protoplanetary Disk—Time scales and Conditions of the Early Solar System" Abstract May 7:
  • David Brain, Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley
    "Aurora in the lumpy magnetic fields of Mars" Abstract
  • May 14: Xander Tielens, University of Gronigen & NASA Ames
    "Building planets one grain at a time" Abstract

12:00 noon- 1:00 pm
Campbell Hall #544


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2008
Astro C12 / EPS C12/L&S C70T:
The Planets
Instructors: G. Marcy & M. Manga
TTh, 11am-12:30pm
4 LeConte

JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
21 February 2008
Bill Bottke ,
SWRI
""An Asteroid Breakup 160 My Ago as the Probable Source of the K-T Impactor""Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
24 January 2008
Margaret Galland Kivelson,
UCLA
"Auroras and related phenomena at moons and planets"Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
29 November 2007
Dan Brownlee ,
University of Washington
"The origin of crystalline silicates around stars- new evidence from the Stardust comet sample return mission"Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


FALL 2007 CIPS SEMINAR SERIES
Organizer: Mate Adamkovics
  • September 4 : Imke de Pater, UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Uranus RPX "
  • September 12 : Geoff Marcy , UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Origin of Planet Eccentricities "
  • September 19 : Eugene Chiang , UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in protoplanetary disks"
  • September 26: Greg Delory, UC Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory
    "Electrical Processes on Mars: New Sources and Sinks for Atmospheric Chemistry?"
  • October 3 : Jerry Edelstein, UC Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory
    "Near-IR RV survey instrument 'TEDI'"
  • October 17 : Jason Barnes , NASA Ames
    "Titan's Sand Dunes: Window to a New World"
    Abstract
  • October 24 : James Roberts , UC Santa Cruz
    "Heating of Enceladus: Is there a subsurface ocean?"Abstract
  • October 31 : Xylar Asay-Davis, UC Berkeley
    "DACIV: A Novel Method for Tracking Clouds in Planetary Atmospheres"
  • November 7 : Eric Gaidos, University of Hawaii
    "Limnology, Geochemistry, and Biology of Icelandic Subglacial Lakes"
  • November 14 : Phil Marcus , UC Berkeley, Dept. of Engineering
    "Building Planetesimals for Fun and Profit"
  • November 21: Ruth Murray-Clay, UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Atmospheric escape from Hot Jupiters
  • November 28 : Rob Lillis, UC Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory
    "Electron reflectometry grab bag at Mars: dust storm effects in the
    thermosphere, magmatic intrusions and how the Dynamo may have died."
  • December 5 : Speaker TBA
    Title: TBA

12:00 noon- 1:00 pm
McCone Hall #325


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
13 September 2007
Eric Gaidos ,
University of Hawaii
"Dying Stars and Living Worlds: Short-lived Radionuclides and the Abundance of Planetary Water "Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2007
Solar System Astrophysics
Undergraduate section: Astro C162 / EPS C162
TTh 2:30-4pm, 544 Campbell Hall

Instructor: Prof. Imke de Pater(Astronomy)

The physical foundations of planetary sciences. Topics include planetary interiors and surfaces, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres, and smaller bodies in our solar system. The physical processes at work are developed in some detail. An evolutionary picture for our solar system and each class of objects, is developed. Some discussion of other (potential) planetary systems is also included.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Imke de Pater.


2007 SUMMER STUDY PROGRAM
Summer Small Spacecraft Study Program
Contact: Greg Delory, 510-643-1991
Space Sciences Laboratory


A student design exercise: defining next generation spacecraft and instrumentation for a small lunar orbiter mission.For more information on this opportunity, click here. Those interested in applying should contact Greg Delory


SPECIAL JOINT EPS- ASTRONOMY SEMINAR
May 23 2007, 4pm
Bruce Buffett, University of Chicago
"Numerical Models of Planetary Dynamos: Dealing with the Challenge of Unresolved Turbulence" Abstract
Colloquium: 12 noon
544 Campbell Hall

WORKSHOP
TITAN II WORKSHOP: TITAN AFTER CASSINI
A follow-up on the workshop "Titan: Pre-Cassini View", 17 Nov. 2003
Organizer: Imke de Pater , UC Berkeley / CIPS

May 15 - 16, 2007, 8:30am- 5:30pm
Space Sciences Laboratory, #105, University of California, Berkeley
Guest Speakers:

  • Sushil Atreya, University of Michigan
    "The Methane Problem"
  • Mike Flasar, NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center
    "Titan's Atmospheric Thermal Structure & Circulation"
  • Bob West, NASA JPL
    "Hazes, aerosols, and DISR Results"
  • Emily Schaller, Caltech
    "Seasonal Change in Titan's Clouds"
  • Chris McKay, NASA Ames Research Center
    "Is Titan's Surface Active?"
  • Mate Adamkovics, UC Berkeley / CIPS
    "Drizzle"
  • Sonja Graves, NASA Ames Research Center
    Pop Up Talk: "Rain & Hail can Reach the Surface of Titan"
  • Jason Barnes, NASA Ames Research Center
    "Titan's Surface in the Near-IR"
  • Howard Zebker, Stanford University
    "Radar Measurements: Electrical Properties of Titan & Constraints on Surface Composition & Structure"
  • Karl Mitchell, NASA JPL
    "Cassini Radar Observations of Titan's Surface"
  • Veronique Vuitton, University of Arizona, Lunar & Plantary Laboratory
    "Upper Atmosphere Chemistry"
  • Steve Ledvina , UC Berkeley -SSL / Steve Brecht, Bay Area Research Corp.
    "Magnetosphere Interactions "
  • TBA
    "Status SDT, Cosmic Vision, Politics"
  • Joe Pitman, Lockheed Martin
    "MIDAS"
  • Ed Sittler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
    "TOAMES"
For a tentative timeline / schedule for both days, click here
TAC SEMINAR
April 2 2007
Alison Farmer , Harvard University
"How to Escape from Saturn (and other places)"
Abstract
Colloquium: 12 noon
544 Campbell Hall

JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
22 March 2007
Josh Eisner, University of California, Berkeley
"Building Blocks of Planets Around Young Stars"
Abstract

661 Campbell Hall Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
15 March 2007
Burkhard Militzer ,
Carnegie Institution of Washington
"Application of Quantum Mechanics to Understanding the Interiors and Evolutionof Planets "Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall
JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
8 March 2007
Amaya Moro-Martin,
Princeton University
"Planets, Planetesimals and Dust: Placing our Solar System into Context "Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
1 March 2007
Jonathan Fortney,
NASA Ames Research Center
"Extreme Planetary Atmospheres: Observations and Models of Hot Jupiters"Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2007
The Role of Water in Planetary Science
Astro 250 Special Topics Graduate Reading Seminar.
Weekly talks by guest speakers are open to everyone, not just enrolled students. Instructors: Mate Adamkovics (Astronomy) and Sarah Zaranek (EPS)

Everything we understand to be alive depends on water. In this graduate seminar we will explore the details of how water can shape the environments of planets and how it relates to life. Starting from a molecular understanding of the unique properties of molecular water, we'll discuss to the roles of water in lithospheres, cryospheres, and atmospheres. Frequently speakers will present reviews of the literature as well as recent research, before leading a class discussion on the material.

Location: 544 Campbell Hall
Time: Wednesdays
Seminar: 12 noon - 1:00pm

Optional Discussion with Speaker: 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Those attending the optional discussion are asked to read assigned papers listed in the class syllabus

    Guest speakers:
  • January 24: Andrew Westphal, Space Sciences Lab, UC Berkeley
    "The Return of Stardust: the first samples from the Kuiper Belt and the Local Interstellar Medium" Abstract
  • January 31: David O'Brien, Planetary Science Institute
    "The Delivery of Water from the Asteroid Belt During Terrestrial Planet Accretion"Abstract
  • February 14: Ralph Milliken, JPL/ Caltech
    "The water content of the Martian surface as seen by the Mars Express OMEGA spectrometer"Abstract
  • February 21: Michael Manga, Dept. of Astronomy, UC Berkeley
  • February 28: Eugene Chiang, Dept. of Astronomy, UC Berkeley
  • March 21: Jared Smith, Lawrence Berkeley Lab
    "What Makes Water Wet: An Overview of the Molecular Level Properties of Water"Abstract
  • April 4: Chris McKay, NASA Ames
    "The Search for life on Mars"
  • April 11: Amy Barr, Southwest Research Institute
    "Grain Size in Icy Satellites" Abstract
  • April 25: Michael H. Wong, UC Berkeley
    "Water in the Outer Planets " Abstract

Image by Mate Adamkovics


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2007
Solar System Astrophysics
Undergraduate section: Astro C162 / EPS C162
Graduate section: Astro C249 / EPS C249

The undergraduate and graduate sections will be held at different times. Class locations and times will be decided in the fall.

Instructor: Prof. Imke de Pater(Astronomy)

The physical foundations of planetary sciences. Topics include planetary interiors and surfaces, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres, and smaller bodies in our solar system. The physical processes at work are developed in some detail. An evolutionary picture for our solar system and each class of objects, is developed. Some discussion of other (potential) planetary systems is also included.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Imke de Pater .


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2007
The Planets
Astro C12 / EPS C12 / L&S C70

Meeting time and location to be announced.

Instructors: Profs. Geoffrey Marcy (Astronomy) & Michael Manga (Earth & Planetary Science)

This class will provide a tour of the planets and moons of the solar system, and an introduction to their internal structures, atmospheres, and surface features. Processes that form planets and act continually to change them (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, giant impacts) are discussed, as are comets, asteroids, rings, and life. Information gained from recent spacecraft missions is highlighted. Intended for non science majors.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Geoffrey Marcy .


PUBLIC LECTURE
Eugene Chiang
Professor of Astronomy and Earth & Planetary Science
University of California, Berkeley
"The Search for Planet X"

Over the last decade, astronomers have discovered over 1000 icy, rocky objects beyond Neptune, including one larger than Pluto. What is known about this "Kuiper Belt" of bodies? What are its implications for the formation of our solar system? What connections can be drawn between our home and other planetary systems? We will describe the chain of scientific discoveries that have allowed us to address these questions for the first time, in addition to some of the politics underlying the demotion of Pluto from planetary status.

Monday, November 27, 2006
Sibley Auditorium, Bechtel Engineering Center
Lecture: 7:00 pm - 8:00pm, Reception following

For a campus map and parking tips, go to http://www.berkeley.edu/map/


FALL 2006 SEMINAR SERIES
Brown bag lunch seminar dates:
Organizers: Mate Adamkovics & Sarah Zaranek
  • September 27 : Mike Wong, UC Berkeley, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Nitrogen on Jupiter- Clouds and Cosmochemistry" Abstract
  • October 4 : Kevin Zahnle , NASA Ames Research Center
    "Earth after the Moon-forming impact " Abstract
  • October 25 : Sarah Milkovich, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech
    "The South Polar Layered Deposits of Mars"Abstract
  • November 1: Sean Raymond, University of Colorado- Boulder
    "Dynamics and Stability in Extra-solar Planetary Systems"
    Abstract
  • November 8 : Wren Montgomery, UC Berkeley, EPS
    "Animal, Vegetable or Mineral?
    Playing Twenty Questions with Exoplanets." Abstract
  • November 15 : Devon Burr, SETI Institute, Center for the Study of Life in the Universe
    "Fluvial transport of sediment: an Earth-Mars-Titan comparison"Abstract
  • November 29 : Emily Schaller, Caltech GPS
    "Seasonal Change in Titan's Cloud Activity"Abstract
  • December 6 : Claire Newman, Caltech, GPS
    "Modeling Titan's atmosphere with a three-dimensional general circulation
    model"
    Abstract

12:00 noon- 1:00 pm
McCone Hall #325


EPS DEPARTMENT SEMINAR
Dr. Qingzhu Yin
UC Davis

"The Window Through the Extinct Radioactivities in the Early Solar System: Before and After 4567 Ma"

Thursday, October 12, 2006
4:00 pm
141 McCone Hall


INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR OPTICAL ENGINEERING TALK

"The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph: Direct Imaging of
Extrasolar Earth-like Planets"Abstract

Speaker: Stuart Shaklan, Interferometry Engineering Group, Jet Propulsion Lab
Organizer: Dan Ceperley, EECS Dept,
Friday, October 13, 2006
11:00 - noon, Pizza provided
521 Cory Hall (Hogan Room)


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2006
The Planets
Astro C12 / EPS C12 / L&S C70

TTh 11:00 a.m.-12:30 a.m.
2050 Valley LSB

Instructors: Profs. Geoffrey Marcy (Astronomy) & Michael Manga (Earth & Planetary Science)

This class will provide a tour of the planets and moons of the solar system, and an introduction to their internal structures, atmospheres, and surface features. Processes that form planets and act continually to change them (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, giant impacts) are discussed, as are comets, asteroids, rings, and life. Information gained from recent spacecraft missions is highlighted. Intended for non science majors.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Geoffrey Marcy .


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
9 March 2006
Taylor Perron ,
University of California, Berkeley
"Oceans on Mars and rain on Titan: the role of fluids in shaping planetary surfaces"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
2 March 2006
Erik Asphaug ,
University of California, Santa Cruz
"Asteroids: Their Origin, Geophysics, and Exploration"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
23 February 2006
Mark Marley ,
NASA Ames
"The Cloudy Atmospheres of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Brown Dwarfs"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
2 February 2006
Carolyn Porco ,
Cassini Imaging Team leader, Director of the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations, & Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado
"Saturn's Rings and its Icy Moon Enceladus: Latest from Cassini"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


SEMINAR SERIES
Brown bag lunch seminar dates:
  • December 12: Michael Manga, Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science
    "Water on Mars "
  • November 7: Taylor Perron, Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science
    "Sediment transport and precipitation rates on Titan"
  • December 12: Franck Marchis, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Orbits of multiple asteroidal systems"
  • January 23: Sarah Zaranek, Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science "Convection and Composition in the Evolution of Planetary Interiors"
  • February 6 : Alison Skelley, Dept. of Chemistry
    "Methods and microdevice instrumentation for in situ detection of bioorganic molecules on Mars "
  • March 20 : Jason Wright, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Characterizing the Nearby Extrasolar Planets: 172 and counting..."
  • April 17 : Eric Ford, Dept. of Astronomy
    "Evolving Theories of Planet Formation"Abstract

12:00pm - 1:00pm
Tan Hall #775

These monthly seminars are designed to encourage interdisciplinary interactions between graduate students, postdocs and junior faculty. The goal is to facilitate interdepartmental collaboration and synergistic research in planetary science.

Organizers: Mate Adamkovics (Astronomy) & Sarah Zaranek (EPS)


CIPS / BAYPAC WORKSHOP
Stardust: The First Cometary and Interstellar Dust Sample Return

December 1, 2005: BayPAC Discussion
December 2, 2005: CIPS/ BayPAC Workshop
9:00am-5:00pm both days
#105 Space Science Lab, Addition Conference Room

Next January,  Stardust,  the first sample return mission from a planetary body since the 1970's, and the first ever from beyond the Moon, will return cometary and contemporary interstellar dust to terrestrial laboratories. These samples are effectively the first bona fide solid samples from the Kuiper Belt and from the Local Interstellar Medium.  They will be available for analysis to the entire scientific community.

The Bay Area Particle Analysis Consortium (BayPAC) and the Center for Integrative Planetary Science (CIPS) at U. C. Berkeley will host a joint workshop on the analysis of Stardust samples on Dec. 1-2.  The workshop will be held at the Space Sciences Laboratory at U. C. Berkeley.   The Bay Area Particle Analysis Consortium (BayPAC) was set up in 2003 to take advantage of the analytical facilities available at Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Stanford and UC Berkeley.    On Dec. 1,  BayPAC will  host a discussion of  the full range of available analytical facilities with special emphasis on facilities in California.    On Dec. 2, we will have a joint CIPS/BayPAC workshop focused on the science that can be expected from analysis of the Stardust cometary and interstellar dust samples.

For a detailed agenda, click here

Organizers: Andrew Westphal (SSL) & Giles Graham (LLNL)


WORKSHOP
Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiative Transfer Workshop
November 16, 2005
9:00am-5:00pm
#105 Space Science Lab, Addition Conference Room
  • Tom Ackerman, PNNL
    "A comprehensive review of ground-based measurements
  • Tarek Zohdi, UC Berkeley"
    "Light scattering and coupled thermal processes in particulate clouds"
  • Graham Feingold, NOAA ETL
    "Small-scale aerosol-cloud interactions"
  • Surabi Menon, LBL
    "Global scale climate effects of aerosol-cloud interactions: Past and future changes"
  • Chris McKay, NASA Ames
    "Transition from Earth to Titan, challenges and goals"
  • Henry Roe, Caltech
    "Titan clouds"
  • Mate Adamkovics, UC Berkeley
    "Titan's aerosol haze"

For a detailed agenda, click here.

Organizer: Mate Adamkovics


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2005
The Physics of Super Earths
Graduate Seminar Course: Astro 250

Mondays 5:00pm- 7:00pm
544 Campbell Hall

Instructors: Profs. Geoffrey Marcy & Eugene Chiang (Astronomy)

Topics to be covered include: observations of super-earths, formation scenarios, composition (rock, rock-ice, gaseous), equations of state, leading to observables, surface effects such as tectonics, seismology, and minerology, composition / retention/ cycling of atmospheres, internal energy/ transport/ thermodynamics/ tidal effects, detection techniques, and characterization by future observations.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Geoffrey Marcy or Eugene Chiang. For class reading, go to: http://cips.berkeley.edu/events/superearths.html


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
3 November 2005
Ralph Lorenz ,
University of Arizona
"Title Unveiled "
Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall

DEPT. OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM
29 September 2005
Robert Scott ,
University of Texas, Austin
"Quantifying Oceanic Turbulence Using Satellite-Based Radar Altimetry"
Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 3110 Etcheverry Hall
Host: Phil Marcus

JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
15 September 2005
Andrew Ingersoll ,
Caltech
"Dynamics of Giant Planet Atmospheres"
Abstract

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


SSL SUMMER 2005 FELLOWSHIP

This summer the Space Sciences Laboratory is funding the SSL Summer Fellowship program in space and planetary sciences. This effort is designed to subsidize up to 50% of a graduate student's summer salary, ideally for workrelated to their eventual thesis topics. While preference will be given to students who perform research at SSL, joint collaborations involving graduate students between SSL researchers and your departments are also welcome.

More details can be found at http://www.ssl.berkeley.edu/fellowships.html


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
19 April 2005

Daniel P. Lathrop , Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park
"Building Laboratory Models of Planetary Cores"
Abstract

Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 3110 Etcheverry Hall
Host: Phil Marcus


COURSE OFFERING Spring 2005
The Planets

Astro C12 / EPS C12 / L&S C70

TTh 8:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m.
Wheeler Auditorium

Instructors: Profs. Imke de Pater(Astronomy) & Raymond Jeanloz(Earth & Planetary Science)

This class will provide a tour of the planets and moons of the solar system, and an introduction to their internal structures, atmospheres, and surface features.Processes that form planets and act continually to change them (e.g., earthquakes, volcanoes, giant impacts) are discussed, as are comets, asteroids, rings, and life. Information gained from recent spacecraft missions is highlighted. Intended for non science majors.

For further detail on this course contact Prof. Imke de Pater.


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM10 April 2005
Steven Squyres ,
Cornell University
"Science Results from the Mars Exploration Rover Mission"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


The Raymond & Beverly Sackler Distinguished Lecture in Astronomy
6 April 2005
Steven Squyres ,
Cornell University
"Mars Exploration Rover Mission"
Abstract

Lecture: 5:45 pm, 1 Pimentel, Free Admission


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
10 March 2005Adam Burrows ,
University of Arizona
"The Physical Theory of Extrasolar Giant Planets and Their Spectral Signatures "
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM1 March 2005
Scott Sheppard ,
Carnegie Institution of Washington
"Variability of Kuiper Belt Objects "
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM3 March 2005
Sabine Stanley ,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
"So Many Dynamos: A study of Planetary magnetic field morphologies "
Abstract
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 141 McCone Hall
Beer following collquium, 5th floor balcony of McCone Hall

JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM10 March 2005
Robert Pappalardo ,
University of Colorado at Boulder
"Wavy Lineaments on Europa"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 1 Le Conte Hall


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2004

Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, ME 267


5108 Etcheverry

Instructor: Profs. Philip Marcus

The first half of the course covers the essential physics of fluid dynamics under the influence of strong rotation and stratification. During the second half, we will examine the dynamics of large-scale flows in oceans and atmospheres, with special attention to: Gulf Stream, jets streams, Antarctic ozone hole, Jupiter's great red spot, other planetary flows, abrupt climate change, and star and planet formation in protoplanetary disks. The emphasis on each topic will depend upon student interest.

Conditions of high Reynolds number, large spatial scales, strong rotation, stratification, shallow aspect ratio and various combinations that often occur in atmospheres, oceans, planetary atmospheres, and astrophysics result in flow behavior that is qualitatively different from what is normally encountered in the laboratory. We shall derive the equations needed to describe these flows, including the quasigeostrophic, shallow-water, and anelastic equations, using a combination of physical intuition and rigorous asymptotic analysis. Topics such as Ekman dissipation, the thermal wind, geostrophy, Poincare, Kelvin and Rossby waves, resonant triads, Karman vortex streets, the beta-plane, potential vorticity, vortex dynamics, and nonlinear and baroclinic instabilities will be covered.

For further detail on this course, go to www.me.berkeley.edu/ME267/ or contact Prof. Philip Marcus.


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2004
Interdisciplinary course on Planetary Sciences (or Solar System Astrophysics)

Astro/ EPS 249
MWF 10:30am - 12:00pm
501 Campbell Hall

Instructors: Prof. Imke de Pater

Discussions in class are strongly encouraged; discussions are best if a variety of students with different backgrounds participate in the class. Topics may range from planetary atmospheres, to surface geology, interior structure and formationof our solar system (including meteorites, asteroids and comets). Topics depend a bit on students' interests.

Book: Planetary Sciences, by de Pater and Lissauer.

For further detail on this course, contact Imke de Pater.


COURSE OFFERING Fall 2004
Graduate Seminar: Classic Papers in Earth & Planetary Science
EPS 290

401 McCone Hall

Instructors: Prof. Raymond Jeanloz

An examination of 7 classic papers that helped shape modern Earth and Planetary Science, this course is intended for graduate students from across the full breadth of the EPS Department.

For further detail on this course, contact Prof. Raymond Jeanloz.


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
28 October 2004
Bill McKinnon ,
Washington University, St. Louis
"Remarkable Moons: Structure and Evolution of the Galilean Satellites of Jupiter"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall


WORKSHOP
Europa: From Geophysics to Astrobiology
October 11, 2004
1:30pm-5:30pm
#105 Space Science Lab, Addition Conference Room

  • Francis Nimmo , UCLA
    "Geophysical constraints on Europa's ice shell"
  • Brad Dalton, NASA Ames,
    "Surface Composition of Europa"
  • Sarah Rieboldt, UC Berkeley
    Pop-up talk: "A Search Strategy for Life on Europa"
  • Kevin Hand, Stanford
    "The Chemistry of the Europan Surface and Putative Ocean Environments"
  • Chris McKay, NASA Ames
    "Search for evidence of life on Europa's surface"
  • Charles Cockell, British Antarctic Survey
    "Microbial exposures to UV radiation in icy environments and some questions about Europa"
  • Michael Manga's Lab
    Pop-up talk: Research in Michael Manga's group
  • Boris Rubinsky, UC Berkeley
    "Biology under extreme condition: cryogenic temperatures and hyperbaric pressures"

Organizer: Imke de Pater and Greg Delory.


JOINT ASTRONOMY / EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM
16 September 2004
Yorum Lithwick ,
University of California, Berkeley
"Planet Formation: The Final Chapter"
Abstract

Tea: 3:30pm, 661 Campbell Hall
Colloquium: 4:00 pm, 2 Le Conte Hall

 

 



Getting to CIPS Events

Archived Events & Courses

To see all the events and classes that have been sponsored by CIPS since it's inception, visit the following links.

Center for Integrative Planetary Science (CIPS)
University of California, Berkeley, Department of Astronomy
601 Campbell Hall MS 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411
(510) 642-8678