Glenn Schneider

Steward Observatory
University of Arizona

CIPS SEMINAR
WEDNESDAY, 24 OCTOBER 2001
4PM
544 CAMPBELL HALL

"Dusty Circumstellar Disks and Substellar Companions"

Current theories of disk/planet evolution in nascent circumstellar environments suggest an epoch of planet-building through the formation and growth of embryonic bodies. During this evolutionary phase, likely from approximately 1-10 million years, the nature of the remnant protostellar disks change as the subsequent accretion of gaseous atmospheres onto still hot giant planets is attendant with a significant decline in gas- to-dust ratios in the disks. The circumstellar environments then become dominated by a second-generation population of dusty debris arising from the collisional erosion of planetesimals. Coorbital planetary-mass bodies will dynamically interact with the dust and influence the spatial distribution of the particles and the large-scale morphologies of the disks. For stars within 100 pc of the Earth, Jovian mass planets still hot from their recent formation may be directly imaged with NICMOS differential coronagpahy at at Kuiper belt like distances from their primaries. I will discuss the recent evidence, from HST disk and companion imaging surveys, for the existence of "hot Jupiters" currently outside of the domain of inference from radial velocity surveys.